Research Groups

Research Groups

INOEL’s six domains of research & development

Organic EL (OLED) : Creating a new light

Organic EL has started to permeate in various fields such as displays and lighting, characterized by its support of flexible implementation, transparency and printing. The Suzuri Lab is engaged in research involving the flexible implementation of OLED, including studies of wet processing whose costs can be reduced in the future. By mounting these technologies on prototypes for automobile and signage applications, the lab accumulates total technological strengths so that OLED technology will contribute to a wide range of industries. The lab also conducts studies of underlying technologies such as film properties and the elucidation of phenomena. (Yoshiyuki Suzuri, Associate Professor)

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Organic transistors (OTFTs) : Realizing new electronic circuits

We are developing high mobility organic thin film transistors that can be directly formed on flexible substrates at low temperatures by using coating and printing methods. We have established a technique for fine pattern electrodes and insulation films using a printing method, and succeeded in formation of equivalent fine patterns using photolithography. We develop and apply this technology to pixel circuits and gate drivers of flexible OLED displays. In addition to fine patterning technology, we also have other technologies such as the evaluation of organic materials, analysis of forms and structures of thin films, simulation analysis of fluids and digital circuits and electronic circuit design.(Makoto Mizukami, Associate Professor, Seungil Cho, Assistant Professor)

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Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) : Realizing thin, light, and transparent OPVs

We develop organic photovoltaics that have unprecedented features such as light weight, flexibility, transparency and designability with the color development of organic pigments, and electromotive force reacting to weak light. Collaborating with the Frontier Center for Organic Materials, we panelize by taking full advantage of technologies owned by Yamagata University such as high-efficiency low-molecule-based OPV materials, charge transport materials, coating-type materials, perovskite materials, transparent device technology and technology for tandem design. We aim to apply our technologies to power generating windows, flexible mobile solar cells and small power generating elements. (Takeshi Sano, Professor)

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Flexible technology : Creating new value with flexible technology

Through “Needs First” academia-industry collaboration, we develop key technologies for flexible organic electronics products that create new values such as thin thinness, light weight, flexible design, etc. We develop world-leading cutting-edge technologies in the fields of flexible substrates (ultra-thin glass, stainless steel foil and barrier films), gas barrier, flexible encapsulation, printing and roll-to-roll. In addition, by applying the developed technologies, we fabricate various flexible devices such as flexible OLED. (Hitoshi Nakada, Professor, Mitsuhiro Koden, Professor, Tadahiro Furukawa, Associate Professor, Toshinao Yuki, Associate Professor)

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Inkjet : Creating new manufacturing with printing technology

Inkjet that can precisely jet ink droplets whose diameter is a fraction of human hair and in an invisible size to freely draw images and patterns having millions, tens of millions or hundreds of millions of dots is a kind of magic pen. Capable of precisely arranging droplets by digital control is attracting attention as a next-generation production technology known as digital fabrication, including not only the creation of documents or photographic images but also illustrations on cloth and construction materials and the manufacture of electronic elements and 3D objects. We are engaged in the development of technology to jet high-viscosity ink and thorough analyses of phenomena where droplets are formed in an infinitesimal period of time in microseconds. (Shinri Sakai, Academic-Industrial Collaboration Professor)

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Batteries : Changing batteries via the power of chemistry

The Battery Research Group focuses on social implementation. We develop not only four primary materials, but also secondary materials such as binders and conductive carbons. We also have a theme to develop new functional expressions with material rubbing technology. Our group has a market analysis function, while development themes are narrowed down by a strategic planning group from the viewpoint of the market. We examine it on a pilot scale and conduct up to production system development, which characterizes us. Going forward, we will extend our service up to safety technology development and evaluation technology through applications to become a material development base. (Hideya Yoshitake, Professor)

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